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Friday PhotoEssay – July 31, 2015

Even though the tomatoes are just starting to ripen, we are beginning to think about fall in the garden! Here’s a before and after look at the garden this week. Can you tell what changed?

Before:

This is Tuesday before our regular work day.

After:

This is Thursday, after the work day. Can you tell what we did? We did harvest the potatoes last week, but this week we removed our spring planted beans because they were full of spider mites and pretty much done. We are planning to replant with different varieties next week for our fall bean crop. We also pulled the pole beans off the trellis, even though they had just started blooming. We will replant the same varieties and see if we get better results this fall.

At long last, the ‘Muir’ lettuce finally gave up in the heat of last week! We had been very impressed with the fact that it had not bolted nor gotten bitter yet. This variety should be a great option for us to grow in spring into summer. We will have to try it again another year to see if the results are the same. We will be replanting lettuces in the next few weeks.

As per usual, the cherry tomatoes are the earliest ripening and most prolific tomatoes in the garden. This year we have Sweet Million (red), Chocolate Cherry (purple), and Yellow Pear (yellow) growing in the tiered Accessible Garden beds.

One of the delights of growing a range of winter squashes – big, beautiful flowers and attractive leaves! These squash blossoms would be great to pick and stuff with cheese or other fillings.

When I was checking our squash stems for signs of vine borers the other day, I noticed this big guy hiding out under the vines. Do you see him?

The zucchini have quickly started producing now that the row cover is removed. I guess the row cover was both a successful and failure as an experiment. It definitely prevented the squash vine borers while it was on, but we didn’t get much squash until it was removed.

Have a great weekend!

Friday PhotoEssay: Year in Review

I’ve been meaning to do the Year in Review post for the Friday PhotoEssay “whole garden” pictures for a couple weeks now. I guess it is good that I waited until now to get a true “after” shot from the cold.

March 10th after a snow!

April 3rd

April 11th

April 25th

May 2nd

May 9th

May 16th

May 23rd

May 30th

June 6th

June 13th

June 20th

June 27th

July 7th

July 11th

July 18th – I think this was pretty much the peak of the garden for the summer, don’t you? Maybe one of the two previous weeks, but this was a pretty green week.

July 24th

August 1st

August 8th

August 15th

August 22nd

August 28th – You can tell things are on the downhill slide now!

September 15th

September 19th

September 26th

October 3rd

October 17th

October 31st – The end of “summer” for the year.

November 21st – Almost put to bed for the winter!

Friday PhotoEssay – August 22nd

Whew! It’s hot and steamy out there! I’m regretting not going out to take pictures first thing this morning.

As a result, you get the shadowy version of the whole garden today. Shadowy and slightly wilty, especially if you are talking about the pumpkins. It’s a good thing they’re almost ripe, because the plants are almost done for.

Also in the not so spectacular category are the zinnias. They usually look great, until all of a sudden they have powdery mildew. Then they look awful until we decide to take them out. And that is really the best option. I think we’re getting near that point here.

Apparently the peanuts are thoroughly enjoying the weather, because they are growing like crazy. I know they don’t look like much from the top, but I’m hopeful that  they will be pretty spectacular when we harvest later this fall!

Have I give you the spiel on how peanuts grow already? I can’t remember. Anyway, what you are looking at in the very center of the picture are the ovary tubes growing down into the soil that will grow the peanuts. Those reddish-brown sticks coming off the stem are what I’m talking about. The plants are still blooming too, which means even more peanuts!

Ironically, the trellis over the walkway has been rather pathetic this year, with both varieties not doing a lot of climbing. But who needs a trellis arch when the okra and the tomatoes can grow together over the path all by themselves? It’s starting to feel a bit like a jungle out here.

Denise made some yummy Indian dishes for our Saturday Sampler last Saturday. This is the Quinoa Chickpea Curry. The recipes should be up on the website soon, but in the meantime you can revisit other recipes here: Saturday Sampler Recipes.

Have a great weekend!

Friday PhotoEssay – July 11th

It’s been a couple weeks since we had a Friday PhotoEssay, which means that I missed taking a weekly whole garden picture last week. I did take one on Monday and again today, but the big change that happened was last week, I think. Tell me what you think: 

 This is from Monday.

 And this is from today. Other than the shadows, I’m not sure I see a big difference just this week. 

But then, this is from June 27th. Just a little bit of difference, right? 

And look what I found this morning! I picked them to ripen on my table over the weekend because heirlooms are very prone to cracking, especially when the weather is hot and the soil is moist or wet. The two brown-colored tomatoes are Black Krim. The yellow is a Northern Lights, and the pink one is a Pink Russian. The Pink Russian and Northern lights are somewhat under-ripe yet, compared to the Black Krim, but I didn’t want to risk them cracking over the weekend. 

 Isn’t this almost the coolest flower you’ve every seen on a vine plant? This is the flower on the Snake Gourd vine. I’ll be honest that I wasn’t expecting that! I just assumed the flowers would look like any other cucumber or squash flower. I had to Google it to make sure that we were growing the right thing! I found this article on Snake Gourds from Mother Earth News.

The Herb & Flower garden continues to be gorgeous. I really need a shadier day so I can get a good picture of it, although most of the flowers are pretty small to get good saturated color from a non-close up picture. I guess you should just come see it in person?

The chickpeas have started blooming too. That’s a much smaller flower than I was expecting, much closer in size to a bean flower than a pea or cowpea flower. They are still pretty sparse too. Maybe that’s what we should expect growing an heirloom variety? 

This is just a blooming week, I guess! These are flowers on the peanuts.  

Have a great weekend! I hope you are starting to enjoy some tomatoes! 

 

Friday PhotoEssay

I think the Demo Garden path is paved with my good intentions of posting more frequently. Time just seems to slip away from me earlier in the week!

Luckily, the garden does not rely on me to blog regularly in order to grow. We really would be in trouble if that were the case! You can see on the right side of the picture that the pumpkins are doing their best to be the first to the top of the trellis. Some of our other cucumbers and vines are just being pokey.

The pumpkins are also doing their best to be the first vine crop with fruit set. They might win! I didn’t see any bees this morning, so I tried to help the cause by transferring pollen from one of the lower male flowers to this female flower that was open. I guess we’ll see if I was successful.

We have new babies! Again! We planted some chicory and onion seeds inside this week, and a few of the chicory are already up. I’m a little surprised, because sometimes chicory can be a little slow. That’s one of the reasons I wanted to start them now rather than in two weeks. They also have a relatively low germination percentage (about 65%), so this way we will be sure to have enough plants in about 6 weeks.

This Rose Scented Thyme is blooming like crazy. It is almost completely coated in pale pink flowers. It is obviously very happy with its location.

Also blooming, but not nearly so attractive is this Endive. Not all of the endive mesclun plants are bolting, but I’m sure they aren’t far behind. That means we will be pulling them out soon and getting ready to plant the bulbing fennel for fall.

The Herbs & Flowers garden is looking so nice already, and the citrus marigolds are still looking better than they ever have before. I’m going to have to find some recipes using citrus marigolds!

Have a great weekend!